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Ecological Monitoring for Construction

While monitoring and management of protected adjacent wetland features is a common condition of most anthropogenic activity approvals, no standard method for such work currently exists in Canada on a national (or provincial) level. Ecological monitoring methods open vary between sites depending on the preferred methods of the body conducting the work, and/or associated regulatory agencies. Consequently, the absence of standardization for ecological monitoring results in wide-ranging interpretation, development, implementation and quality of monitoring plans which in turn creates a “grey area” when it comes to consistency, compliance and accountability. What can you do to make sure you are working in compliance when there is no standard?
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Hydromodification - Causes, Effects, and Mitigation

As professionals in erosion and sediment control we are often focused on on-site erosion and sediment controls. When considering changes in runoff rates and volumes, however, it is essential to look downstream of the site to understand how changes in hydrology may adversely affect downstream receiving waters from the standpoints of degradation, aggradation, and aquatic habitat. This presentation will focus on the causes and effects of hydromodification, the roles of peak flow rates and runoff/streamflow volume, and the fundamentals of mitigating these effects. The presentation will provide examples of strategies to mitigate impacts of hydromodofication including the importance of stormwater volume reduction, control of frequently occurring events that form channels, and bed and bank stabilization.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
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IECA Annual Expo 2019 - Exhibit Booth Registration

http://www.ieca.org/images/Events/2019_AnnualConferenceHeader_2550x675.jpg
Description: IECA Annual Conference and Expo is the preeminent gathering of erosion and sediment control industry professionals from around the world. The Conference is expected to encompass close to 2,000 field representatives. Exhibit to demonstrate your products and services to the engineers who specify their use, the contractors who buy and use products and services, and the regulators who monitor the sites - all at one show! Don't miss this opportunity to build relationships with your share of this growing market's decision makers. Attendees will include professionals of all industry sectors including contractors, land developers, engineers, utilities, manufacturers, contractors, home builders, landscape architects, government agencies, and academics. View the interactive floor plan to see who's signed-up to exhibit in 2018.

Start Date:
Thursday, February 21, 2019
End Date:
Friday, February 22, 2019
Location:
700 14th St.
Denver, CO 80202
UNITED STATES


Implementing a SWPPP - Easy, right?

The design is complete, the permits have been obtained, and contracts are in place for contractors. It's time to get construction started! What could possibly go wrong? A SWPPP, stormwater pollution prevention plan, is a best guess about how the construction site will begin, progress and finish based upon the information that the design has before construction. However, it is rare that construction progresses as the designer envisioned. When implementing a SWPPP, expect to encounter the following: - The contractor will have a different - and possibly better - way of grading the site, along with a different construction sequence. - The unforeseen will be uncovered and it will impact the construction schedule. - Not all parties on the construction site will agree on E&SC or stormwater management for the site. When implementing the SWPPP, the inspector/site manager must adapt to these issues while still meeting the intent of all permits. SWPPP modifications. There is no perfect SWPPP. All SWPPPs will need revision and modification during construction. Some states do not require that plans be resubmitted when modifications are required. Other states do require plan submittal and approval. Know your state's requirements - and any professional requirements. In most states, professional engineers are the only people licensed to design pipes and embankments (think sediment basins and culverts). The SWPPP must reflect what's on the ground and vice versa. For example, when silt fence or check dams are removed when they are no longer needed, the SWPPP should be modified to show that these measures have been removed. Inspection documentation should also indicate that the measures have been removed and why they were removed. Together, the modified SWPPP and inspection documentation should clearly tell the story of the site conditions at the time of the inspections. Take photos of the site as well to confirm site conditions. Documentation. As the SWPPP is revised or modified, document the changes on the SWPPP sheets, in inspection reports and with photos. Documentation is critical to show compliance. The construction general permit allows time for a contractor/developer to respond to problems found on a construction site, and if the problems are resolved within that timeframe, the site is in compliance. Note that some states have additional regulations governing construction sites and off-site sedimentation can be considered a violation of the regulation, regardless of storm size. Besides SWPPP modification and inspection reports, a site manager/inspector must also keep good documentation of rain events. The Construction General Permit requires that measures be designed for the 2yr, 24hr rain event. To determine the return interval for each storm, document the time a storm started and ended and the depth of rain. That information can be compared to rainfall information provided on NOAA's Atlas 14 Point Precipitation Frequency Estimates website (https://hdsc.nws.noaa.gov/hdsc/pfds/pfds_map_cont.html) to determine the storm's return interval. Site managers/inspectors should use the rainfall data to make decisions about the failed measures. If measures failed in a storm that exceeded the 2 year storm equivalent intensity, the measures were adequate and should be reinstalled. If measures failed in a storm that was less than or equal to the 2 year storm event, the measures should be upgraded. can be compared to the rain fall information on NOAA's Atlas 13 site to determine the equivalent intensity storm. As a final good practice on a construction site, provide feedback to the designer about the site: what worked well, what didn't work well. If that information is not conveyed to the designer, the same issues may occur on other construction sites.
Member Price:
$90.00
Nonmember Price:
$120.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Improvements in Silt Fence Installations Determined Through

Silt fence performance, when used as a perimeter control, can be affected by a wide variety of factors (i.e., material properties, installation techniques, and site characteristics). The ability to evaluate differences in such factors provides a corridor for improvement that would likely go unnoticed in uncontrolled field conditions. The sediment barrier testing apparatus at the Auburn University Erosion and Sediment Control Test Facility (AU-ESCTF) has shown that by consistently replicating factors such as: topography, flow rate, and sediment loading; performance evaluations can be conducted on various types of sediment barriers and installation methods. This presentation will discuss eight different installation configurations tested on a non-woven, wire backed reinforced silt fence to determine performance as it relates to structural integrity, sediment retention, and water quality.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Improving Infiltration & Vegetation in Post-Cons

This webinar will highlight treatment technologies that can be implemented in the construction industry to manage turbidity from dewatering operations. Dewatering methods are briefly introduced; however, the course focuses on best available technologies to treat and polish pumped effluent. Participants will be exposed to a decision matrix that assists in identifying the appropriate treatment for a site specific operation. Upon selection of the treatment, basic design elements are presented for consideration. The webinar targets a broad based audience who can use the information provided as a foundation to then independently research a specific treatment technology in more detail.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Infiltration: Does your design hold water? - Part 1 & Part 2

This two part webinar will provide attendees with an intermediate knowledge of how to properly site, test, and analyze an infiltration basin. Examples of projects will be presented. And the class will complete mounding analysis for basins based on real world qualities.
Member Price:
$75.00
Nonmember Price:
$100.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Infiltration: Does your design hold water? - Part One

This two part webinar will provide attendees with an intermediate knowledge of how to properly site, test, and analyze an infiltration basin. Examples of projects will be presented. And the class will complete mounding analysis for basins based on real world qualities.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
↑/↓ Full Details