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Best of the BMP's • Part 1

This is Part 1 of a two part course introducing you to Storm Water Regulations. You will learn how to identify, classify, inspect and document the repair Best Management Practices, or BMPs, used on construction Sites to help prevent the pollution of storm water.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
↑/↓ Full Details


Best of the BMP's • Part 2

This is Part 2 of the two part course on Storm Water Regulations. Module 1 laid the foundation and provided an understanding of what Best Management Practices are used on construction sites. This module will teach you how to inspect and document the repair of BMPs.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
↑/↓ Full Details


Biotic Soil Amendments for Site Revegetation

Biotic Soil Amendments, BSA's, have become as cost effective way to successfully re-vegetate sites with poor soils. The erosion control is pretty good at preventing erosion when we do what we know we should, however we still fail all too often at the vegetation establishment goals. BSA's offer a cost effective way to jumpstart the soil building process at the time of seeding to ensure the site will be stable long term. This presentation explores the available BSA's and follows case studies of their effective use on challenging projects.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
↑/↓ Full Details


Controlling Turbidity: Getting Flocculation to Work on Your Site

While the US EPA has withdrawn its proposed turbidity limit on construction site runoff, there are still many states have or are proposing their own enforcement levels. Construction site owners and managers are also looking for ways to avoid public outcry and potential lawsuits over muddy water leaving their site. In most cases, typical and even more advanced erosion and sediment control practices will not prevent discharges that look like chocolate milk. This two-part seminar will explore the principles behind chemical treatments to rapidly settle suspended solids and reduce turbidity in runoff from construction sites. In the second part, he will then go over a variety of methods to apply those principles to greatly reduce turbidity. After conducting research on this subject for over 10 years in both laboratory and active construction site setting, McLaughlin has a lot of data to back up his recommendations! He will wrap up with a discussion of suggested chain of command options to avoid failures.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Ecological Monitoring for Construction

While monitoring and management of protected adjacent wetland features is a common condition of most anthropogenic activity approvals, no standard method for such work currently exists in Canada on a national (or provincial) level. Ecological monitoring methods open vary between sites depending on the preferred methods of the body conducting the work, and/or associated regulatory agencies. Consequently, the absence of standardization for ecological monitoring results in wide-ranging interpretation, development, implementation and quality of monitoring plans which in turn creates a “grey area” when it comes to consistency, compliance and accountability. What can you do to make sure you are working in compliance when there is no standard?
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
↑/↓ Full Details




IECA Annual Conf & Expo 2019 - Exhibitor Booth Registration

images/Events/http://www.ieca.org/images/Events/2019_AnnualConferenceHeader_2550x675.jpg
Description: IECA Annual Conference and Expo is the preeminent gathering of erosion and sediment control industry professionals from around the world. The Conference is expected to encompass close to 2,000 field representatives. Exhibit to demonstrate your products and services to the engineers who specify their use, the contractors who buy and use products and services, and the regulators who monitor the sites - all at one show! Don't miss this opportunity to build relationships with your share of this growing market's decision makers. Attendees will include professionals of all industry sectors including contractors, land developers, engineers, utilities, manufacturers, contractors, home builders, landscape architects, government agencies, and academics. View the interactive floor plan to see who's signed-up to exhibit in 2018.

Start Date:
Thursday, February 21, 2019
End Date:
Friday, February 22, 2019
Location:
700 14th St.
Denver, CO 80202
UNITED STATES


Implementing a SWPPP - Easy, right?

The design is complete, the permits have been obtained, and contracts are in place for contractors. It's time to get construction started! What could possibly go wrong? A SWPPP, stormwater pollution prevention plan, is a best guess about how the construction site will begin, progress and finish based upon the information that the design has before construction. However, it is rare that construction progresses as the designer envisioned. When implementing a SWPPP, expect to encounter the following: - The contractor will have a different - and possibly better - way of grading the site, along with a different construction sequence. - The unforeseen will be uncovered and it will impact the construction schedule. - Not all parties on the construction site will agree on E&SC or stormwater management for the site. When implementing the SWPPP, the inspector/site manager must adapt to these issues while still meeting the intent of all permits. SWPPP modifications. There is no perfect SWPPP. All SWPPPs will need revision and modification during construction. Some states do not require that plans be resubmitted when modifications are required. Other states do require plan submittal and approval. Know your state's requirements - and any professional requirements. In most states, professional engineers are the only people licensed to design pipes and embankments (think sediment basins and culverts). The SWPPP must reflect what's on the ground and vice versa. For example, when silt fence or check dams are removed when they are no longer needed, the SWPPP should be modified to show that these measures have been removed. Inspection documentation should also indicate that the measures have been removed and why they were removed. Together, the modified SWPPP and inspection documentation should clearly tell the story of the site conditions at the time of the inspections. Take photos of the site as well to confirm site conditions. Documentation. As the SWPPP is revised or modified, document the changes on the SWPPP sheets, in inspection reports and with photos. Documentation is critical to show compliance. The construction general permit allows time for a contractor/developer to respond to problems found on a construction site, and if the problems are resolved within that timeframe, the site is in compliance. Note that some states have additional regulations governing construction sites and off-site sedimentation can be considered a violation of the regulation, regardless of storm size. Besides SWPPP modification and inspection reports, a site manager/inspector must also keep good documentation of rain events. The Construction General Permit requires that measures be designed for the 2yr, 24hr rain event. To determine the return interval for each storm, document the time a storm started and ended and the depth of rain. That information can be compared to rainfall information provided on NOAA's Atlas 14 Point Precipitation Frequency Estimates website (https://hdsc.nws.noaa.gov/hdsc/pfds/pfds_map_cont.html) to determine the storm's return interval. Site managers/inspectors should use the rainfall data to make decisions about the failed measures. If measures failed in a storm that exceeded the 2 year storm equivalent intensity, the measures were adequate and should be reinstalled. If measures failed in a storm that was less than or equal to the 2 year storm event, the measures should be upgraded. can be compared to the rain fall information on NOAA's Atlas 13 site to determine the equivalent intensity storm. As a final good practice on a construction site, provide feedback to the designer about the site: what worked well, what didn't work well. If that information is not conveyed to the designer, the same issues may occur on other construction sites.
Member Price:
$90.00
Nonmember Price:
$120.00
Available for Immediate Download
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Lessons Learned from 46,000 ESC Inspections

Every day, 1,000's of construction site erosion and sediment control inspections are recorded by public and private inspectors across the country. Wouldn't it be helpful to compile and analyze the results of those inspections? This discussion summarizes analysis of inspection data recorded in over 46,000 construction site erosion and sediment control inspections on residential, commercial, municipal and large grading projects over a period of more than eight years.
Member Price:
$50.00
Nonmember Price:
$65.00
Available for Immediate Download
↑/↓ Full Details